Victor Bachmann

July 13, 2010

The Worst Part of Fighting

Filed under: Fights,Training — The Professor @ 3:01 pm

More like postBONED!

This coming Friday was supposed to beMitch Clarke’s title shot against Curtis DeMarce. Two weeks before the show, the whole event was cancelled. Many of my teammates had spent the last 2 or 3 months putting in hours everyday to get ready for fights on the card. All of them are devastated.

This is a pain I know all too well. I have, more than once, gone a year training for fights that had fallen through. Some promoters would try harder to find replacement opponents. I would go through a laundry list of names before finding an opponent or giving up.

Training camps are hard on the body and injuries happen all the time. Rarely does a fighter go into a fight at 100%. A week before my second fight, I had torn a bunch of ligaments in my elbow and could barely move my arm. I spent most of the week with my arm taped up and the pain was so bad I couldn’t sleep at night. The thought of dropping out of my fight never occurred to me. I’m not sure if I realized I could.

That fight was tough and my performance was terrible. I did manage a win, but in retrospect I’m not sure that it was worth the risk. Full function of your arm is important in a fight. The toll on my body was pretty bad, I spent the next week bed ridden with the flu and it took months for my elbow to fully recover.

Fighting is risking to begin with. You have got an athlete pretty intent on removing your head from your body and it’s important that you are able to defend yourself with everything you can. An injury can mean more than a loss. Pushing an injured body to it’s already stretched limits affects an athlete for the rest of their life. The injury won’t heal properly and will affect future fights. Not to mention that this is the same body that you will stick with for the rest of your life.

It’s hard to find a good promotion to fight for; one that has respect for their fighters, pays them fairly, is fun to fight for, and has their shit together. The last one is harder to find than you’d think. I was supposed to fight in KOTC: Terror on the Tundra and then KOTC: Battleground in Grand Prarie. Both cancelled. Many of my teammates were supposed to fight in TFC 11: Destiny. Cancelled.

A cancelled event can be more frustrating than a dropped opponent. Both fighters are wanting and able to fight, training camps have been set up or finished, and fighters have sold tickets to friends and family. Sometimes other promotions pick up fights, but most fighters are left scrambling to find an event to fight in.

There is little consolation to a fighter. They are trying to build a career. Most fighters I know are living paycheck to paycheck and if they miss a fight it might mean they have to miss the next fight because they are busy working to make ends meet. MMA is a fickle business and people forget your name quickly.

I have gotten used to the idea that when I am training for a fight that there is a good chance that the fight will get cancelled. I enjoy training for a fight, sparring with my teammates, and getting my body into shape. The challenges of training camp can satisfying, even if it seems pointless. Of course, it’s always pointless. Even if you win a fight, you’re back in the gym the next week. Right?

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3 Comments »

  1. Good article Victor!
    Always a classy fighter

    Comment by Evan — July 13, 2010 @ 7:24 pm | Reply

  2. Victor…really enjoy your articles. Very good read. After seeing the troubles with KOTC and TFC, which Edmonton promotion would you like to fight for next?

    Comment by Grienke — July 13, 2010 @ 8:11 pm | Reply

  3. I wasn’t on the TFC 11 card but I’m kind of sad about TFC. They had always treated me pretty well, better than other promotions.

    Next Edmonton promotion? Who knows. There’s enough to pick from. It just has be the right time and opponent.

    Comment by The Professor — July 14, 2010 @ 4:52 am | Reply


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